12 Searches You Can Do Yourself

When searching for a lost or missing life insurance policy there are often clues to be found if one knows where to look. Following are 12 searches that you can do yourself. They may be time-consuming but it may be time very well spent.

  1. Look through your loved one’s income tax returns and personal papers for canceled checks to insurance companies.
  2. Look through any address books and old bills for an insurance company name and/or policy number.
  3. Talk with family and friends who may have shared an agent with your loved one.
  4. Check with an accountant, financial planner or stockbroker that your loved one may have used.
  5. Check with any social, fraternal, or professional organizations or trade unions that your loved one may have belonged to.
  6. Sometimes people have all their insurance with one agent. Look for the name of the insurance agent who may have written your loved one’s auto, personal property, health or other insurance.
  7. If your loved one was ill, check hospital records for the name of the health insurance company. Health plans often have a death benefit rider attached.
  8. Go to the probate court and get a copy of your loved one’s estate inventory. This is public information and may lead you to policy information.
  9. If your loved one was employed at the time of death, check with the employer for any group insurance that may have been provided. Check with colleagues for any information that they may have. (If retired, check the ex-employer because group coverage may have been converted to individual coverage at retirement. Also check with the retirement administrator).
  10. If your loved one died while travelling, (especially business travel) check with the travel agent, airline and credit card companies for any travel insurance that may have been purchased.
  11. If your loved had an email account, check for any messages to or from an insurance agent or company.
  12. If there were any loans outstanding (auto, credit union, mortgage, etc.), check with the lender for any “credit life” coverage. Oh, and don’t forget to monitor your loved one’s incoming mail for a year for any premium reminders or other life insurance company correspondence.

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